ASTM C182

Standard Test Method for Thermal Conductivity of Insulating Firebrick

The heat flow through a refractory is determined with a water-cooled copper calorimeter. The temperature limit of refractory must be specified, as well as the hot face or mean test temperatures desired. The maximum hot face temperature for testing is 2700°F. The specimens required are six 9" bricks or an 18" x 13.5" x 2.5" slab.

First hot face temperature specified:  $1500
Each additional test temperature:  $370
First mean temperature specified: $1750
Each additional test temperature:  $370

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SIGNIFICANCE AND USE

The thermal conductivity of insulating firebrick (IFB) is a property required for the selection of IFB for a specific thermal performance. Users select brick to provide a specified heat-loss and cold-face temperature without exceeding the temperature limitation of the brick. This test method establishes placement of thermocouples and the positioning of test samples in the calorimeter. This test method must be used with Test Method C201.

1. SCOPE

1.1 This test method supplements Test Method C201, and shall be used in conjunction with that test method to determine the thermal conductivity of insulating firebrick.

COPYRIGHT NOTICE

Extracted, with permission, from ASTM C182 Standard Test Method for Thermal Conductivity of Insulating Firebrick, copyright ASTM International, 100 Barr Harbor Drive, West Conshohocken, PA 19428. A copy of the standard may be purchased from ASTM International, phone 610-832-9555, e-mail: service@astm.org, website:www.astm.org.

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